The Calgary Journal
The Calgary Journal

Profiles

Former adventurer succeeding in the business field in Calgary after life of expeditions

Clarke1thumbJamie Clarke has traded in the experience of being on the side of a mountain battered by bone-chilling winds for the steady confines of a warehouse and office.

After adventures in over 40 countries, Clarke finds himself indoors as he works between his two flourishing businesses in Calgary: Out There and LiveOutThere.com.

"I learned early on that to be a successful adventurer, you've got to be good at business," Clarke said. "You have to figure out a way to pay for your adventures. At an early age, I began to realize I have to figure out how to fund my trips, so I had to learn the business of adventure."

An "adventrepreneur" is someone who creates or runs a business that focuses on adventure gear and experiences. Clarke clearly fits into this mold.

Having a sense of humour isn't all that it's cracked up to be

Emily picture 1Almost everyone claims that a sense of humour is the most desirable trait in his or her romantic companion, but Emily Seymour, a female comedian claims this is not the case.

Seymour, a student at Red Deer College studying theatre performance and creation, was born and raised in Calgary, Alta. She has performed with improvisational groups around the city, and as a solo act at clubs including The Laugh Shop Comedy Club and the Loose Moose Theatre Company.

Seymour says that, "men want a woman who will laugh at their jokes."

She has had this idea about men for a while now. Seymour has come to the conclusion that all funny girls are single.

At 26, this role brings a new challenge — finding another job

photo8thumbOn any weekend trip out to Banff, Atlta., your first personal interaction will likely be with one of the many service industry workers that comprise the backbone of the mountain town's tourism industry.

This 18 to 30-year-old demographic makes up the largest percentage of Banff's fluid population, yet the youngest member of town council previous to the most recent election was in his 30s.

Which is why Corrie DiManno, a 26-year-old Banff local, decided to run in the October 2013 town election.

And with a total of 1,310 votes, not only was she elected as the youngest town councillor Banff has seen, she came in just six votes behind the leading number of votes to Stavros Karlos, a Banff local who has served on council since 2007. Voters elected a total of six town councillors out of 10 running candidates.

By focusing the lens on people he meets on the street, Jeremy Fokkens makes personal connections in order to get authentic snapshots that tell a story

3thumbJeremy Fokkens met Rubina on one of his evening treks through Dhaka, Bangladesh. She approached him and asked him for money three nights in a row. When he refused on the third night, Fokkens said the 11-year-old girl quit asking for money, but returned his greeting whenever he walked by.

Fokkens referred to meeting Rubina as one of his most profound encounters. She was going to school during the day and, because her father was sick and unable to work, had to beg to help support her family at night. Fokkens said they hung out on the street while he asked questions, through a translator, and took photos of her.

What surprised him the most, he said, was that she never asked for anything in return.