Feature Stories

AndyMitchell TrudeauLaugh photo1 RobertAngus Desmet_RotatingBanner crowchild_classic_7 downtown
preload image preload image

#DownturnDiaries: Stephen Avenue sages make ends meet despite unemployment, homelessness and addiction.

How four Calgary seniors are getting by during tough economic times.

Justin Trudeau offers encouragement to struggling Alberta energy sector

Prime minister’s first visit to Calgary since elected filled with pledges for Alberta’s energy sector

Ice wait times in Calgary still an issue for many hockey enthusiasts

City of Calgary has plans to add more rinks in 2016 to accommodate both players and parents

Local Bindery Still in Business

Many people believe that bookbinding is out of style, but a local bookbindery in Calgary has been around for almost a hundred years

Unanswered questions about Bill 6 cause lingering concern in Alberta’s agricultural community

Consultations being set to draft codes and standards for new legislation

Crowchild Classic 2016

An insiders look at the exciting rivalry game between MRU and U of C

Upsides to the downturn: how the economic situation is sparking positive outcomes

Experts think 2016 will bring positive things to Calgarians despite oil slump

Donald Ethell says often wives experience negative effects

Donald Ethell says he's aware that the traumatic events of his life as a soldier left him with troubling thoughts and emotions, which triggered bad behavior. Ethell, Alberta's Lieutenant Governor, says that behavior hurt not only him, but his wife, Linda.

While most people are familiar with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), he says there's another layer of PTSD that people are unfamiliar with that affects family and friends of soldiers suffering from the disorder. He calls this "secondary PTSD."

Ethell, who became the Lieutenant Governor of Alberta in May 2010, joined the Canadian Army in 1970 and spent many years working to protect his country. He served in Cyprus, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Egypt, Israel, Central America and the Balkans. He saw people hung off wires and men run over by tanks, among many other tragic events that stuck in his mind, which is why he is advocating for more PTSD awareness and treatment.

According to familyofavet.com, the spouse of someone with PTSD often thinks they have the power to fix the problem for their partner. The website indicates that this is often not the case and that the person struggling with the disorder will likely need to undergo intensive treatment.

Ethell says a combination of counseling and medication has helped him immensely to find peace with himself and his family.

For more information on support for loved ones with PTSD, visit the following websites:

Military Family

Gift From Within

Stripes

afreeman@cjournal.ca

Tags: